Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Wacky Reference Wednesday, No. 195

The Twelve #12 Cover. 2011. Gouache and acrylic on bristol board, 13 × 19″.

I already posted an exhaustive process video on this cover (embedded below, in case you missed it), but I wanted to share the Sculptris model I made for Laughing Mask. Because it's gold and shiny, the computer was especially helpful in achieving reflections that were convincing, if not wholly accurate. The image on the left is a fully-rendered ray tracing in Photoshop, while the right features the native rendering mode in Sculptris, which is built for speed. As you can see, what I didn't need, I barely bothered to sculpt.







 The Wacky Reference Wednesday contest deadline is just a month away! It's your chance to win a custom piece of original art, painted by yours truly. Full details here.






10 comments:

  1. How easy is it to model using Sculptris?

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    Replies
    1. It's easier than "real" sculpting. Took me about 30 minutes to get a handle on it.

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  2. Paolo,
    Thanks for the videos detailing your approach to painting and the techniques that you've developed. They are incredible. I really appreciate your honesty in the videos about the process and especially your emotions after the painting was complete. I feel like the feeling artists have after completing a piece never gets discussed honestly and we can feel like we're the only ones who have less than jubilant reactions to our finished pieces. Thanks for that!

    Rich

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    Replies
    1. My pleasure, Rich. Thanks for watching!

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  3. Wow,great video. Thank you!

    So you printed out your color study on what I'm assuming is a large ink jet printer. Do you have to seal the print at all? How does the water based paint react with the ink, or is it an issue at all?

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  4. Nope, no sealing. I prefer to paint on a surface that can soak up paint as I apply it. As for the ink, it's Epson's best, and it proclaims itself archival. Either way, the layer of ink is so thin compared to my paints that I doubt it will ever be an issue. But if it is, I will definitely cry about it here.

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  5. Paolo thank you so much for posting these videos. I feel like its Christmas just watching you paint! If you don't mind me asking, what kind of paper did you use to print your color comp and paint on? I have an Epson 1900 and would like to try this technique as well. Thanks!

    Ryan

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    Replies
    1. Sorry I just heard the answer to my question at the beginning of your video. Anyway, thanks for everything Paolo you're the best!!!

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    2. Sweet. I've used the 3-ply 500 series paper for some time, though recently I've switched to the 2-ply semi-smooth, which you can buy pre-cut to 11 x 17". There's a little more buckling, but as long as you tape it down, it's fine at the end. It's also easier to send through the printer.

      Also, as I may have mentioned, the color is a bit faded, since it's not coated for printing. I've bought some Arches watercolor digital printing paper, but I haven't tried it out yet.

      Best of luck!

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  6. Awesome thanks so much Paolo! I'll be trying out both brands of paper. Looking foreword to your next post!

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